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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Internal Security, Foreign Affairs, Industry

Article 71: The police (Shurtah)

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 71: The police (Shurtah) have two branches: the military police, who are under the command of the Amir of Jihad, in other words, the war department, and the police who are under the control of the Ruler to protect the security, and they are under the authority of the Department of Internal Security. The two branches have specific training and specific culture in order for them to carry out their responsibilities in the best manner.

Police forces are divided into two parts: the military police and the police that work under the command of the Ruler, who must have a special uniform and special signs specific for keeping security.

Al-Azhari said: “Shurtah of any thing is its best. This includes Shurat because they are the best soldiers. It is also said that Shurtah are the first group that come ahead of the Army. It is also mentioned that they are called Shuratan because they have signs that characterise them, in terms of uniform and status”, this is also chosen by Al-Asma’i. It is also mentioned in Al-Qamus: “Shurtah, where the individual is called Shurat, would mean the first battalion that attend the war and is ready for death, it is also the helper of the governors; and they were called so because they announced themselves through signs that characterise them.”

In regards to the military police, which is one of the divisions of the Army that has its sign, it comes ahead of the Army to control its matters, it is a part of the Army and follows the Amir of Jihad; in other words, it follows the war department.

Regarding the police that are put under the service of the rulers, they follow the Department of Internal Security. Al-Bukhari narrated from Anas:

«إِنَّ قَيْسَ بْنَ سَعْدٍ كَانَ يَكُونُ بَيْنَ يَدَيِ النَّبِيِّ  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم بِمَنْزِلَةِ صَاحِبِ الشُّرَطِ مِنَ الأَمِيرِ»

“Qais bin Sa`d was to the Prophet  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم like a chief police officer to an Amir”. What is meant here is Qays Ibn Sa’d Ibn ’Ubadah Al-Ansari Al-Khazraji. Al-Tirmidhi narrated it with the wording:

«كَانَ قَـيْسُ بْنُ سَعْدٍ مِنَ النَّبِيِّ  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم بِمَنْزِلَةِ صَاحِبِ الشُّرَطِ مِنَ الأَمِيرِ، قَالَ الأَنْصَارِيُّ: يَعْنِي مِمَّا يَلِي مِنْ أُمُورِهِ»

“Qais bin Sa`d was to the Prophet  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم like a chief police officer to an Amir. Al-Ansari said: It means he was one that discharged his issues”.

The Khalifah is allowed to make all the police that are responsible for internal security part of the Army, in other words, that they are placed within the war department, and he is also permitted to make an independent department, in other words, an internal security department.

In this article it is adopted that this section will be independent; in other words, the police that are placed under the service of the rulers to protect their security must follow the Internal Security Department as an independent organisation that answer directly to the Khalifah like other State organisations. This is due to the narration from Anas mentioned previously about Qays Ibn Sa'd, and following the independence of the four departments related to Jihad as mentioned before. Each one of them would follow the Khalifah, rather than to be left all together as one organisation.

Thus the Shurtah would follow the Department of Internal Security.

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