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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / War Department

Article 65: The Commander of army and military ranks

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 65:The Khalifah is the Commander of the Army and he appoints the Chief of General Staff, a general for each brigade, and a commander for every division. The remaining ranks in the Army are appointed by the brigadiers and commanders. The appointment of a person in the General Staff is according to his level of military expertise and is carried out by the Chief of General Staff.

The Khalifah is the general leader for all of the Muslims in this world, in order to establish the rules of the Shari’ah and carry the Islam to the rest of the people. The main method to carry Islam to the rest of the world is Jihad, and so it is imperative that he undertakes Jihad, since the contract of the Khalifah is upon him personally, and ,therefore, it is not permitted for anyone else to undertake it. Accordingly, the management of the issue of Jihad is specific to the Khalifah and it is not permitted for anyone else to undertake it. Even though every Muslim undertakes Jihad, the undertaking of Jihad and the management of Jihad are two different things. Jihad is obligatory upon every Muslim, but the management of Jihad is for the Khalifah alone, and not anyone else. The Khalifah can appoint someone to carry out on his behalf what has been obligated upon him as long as he is under his observation and supervision, while it is not permitted to give him complete independence without his monitoring and supervision. The monitoring that the Khalifah undertakes here is not like the type of reporting that the assistant gives him; rather the one who he has delegated remains directly under his orders and direct supervision. The leadership of the Army can be given to whomever he pleases with the condition that they are under the control of the Khalifah and his direct supervision. It is not permitted for him to appoint someone without retaining direct supervision and control over him, which must not be simply symbolic. This is because the contract of the Khilafah is upon him personally and so it is obligatory for him to manage the affairs of Jihad. Accordingly, what is said in other non-Islamic systems that the Head of State is the Commander and Chief of the Army, and this leadership is symbolic while another independent commander is appointed to the Head of the Army, is considered invalid according to the Islamic viewpoint, and is something that the Shari’ah does not agree to. Rather, the Shari’ah obligates that the Khalifah should be the practical Commander of the Army.

As for non-leadership positions in the technical, administrative or other matters, the Khalifah may appoint others to act independently on his behalf in the same manner as the governors, and it is not necessary for them to be under his direct control or for him to supervise them. Additionally, the Messenger  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to personally undertake the practical leadership of the Army and the leadership during the battles, and would appoint commanders over sections of the Army that would go out for battle expeditions without him. He  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to appoint a commander for each expedition, and sometimes would take the precaution of appointing someone else to succeed them if they were killed, as happened with the battle of Mu’tah. Al-Bukhari reported from ’Abd Allah b. Umar (ra) who said:

«أَمَّرَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم فِي غَزْوَةِ مُؤْتَةَ زَيْدَ بْنَ حَارِثَةَ فَقَالَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم إِنْ قُتِلَ زَيْدٌ فَجَعْفَرٌ وَإِنْ قُتِلَ جَعْفَرٌ فَعَبْدُ اللَّهِ بْنُ رَوَاحَةَ»

“The Messenger of Allah appointed Zaid Bin Haritha a leader in Mu’tah expedition. He  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم said: if Zaid is killed, then Ja’far Bin Abi Talib takes the flag, and if Ja’far is killed, then ’Abdullah Bin Rawahah takes it”. Therefore, the Khalifah is the one who appoints the commander of the Army, appoints the brigadiers and gives them the banners and appoints the leaders of the divisions. The Army which was sent to Al-Sham like the Army of Mu’tah and the Army of Usamah was a single brigade, with the evidence being that the Prophet  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم had tied the banner for Usamah. The expeditions that fought in theArabian Peninsula and returned back to Madinah, such as the expedition of Sa’d Bin Waqqas which he  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم sent towards Makkah, were all in the form of divisions. This indicates that the brigadiers and the commanders of the divisions are appointed by the Khalifah. It is not confirmed that the Prophet  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم appointed anyone other than leaders of the Armies and the commanders of the expeditions, which indicates that their appointment in the battlefield was left to their leaders.

With regards to the Chief of Staff who is responsible for the technical matters, he is similar to the Commander of the Army in terms of being appointed by the Head of State and he can be made independent and carry out his duties without being directly supervised by the Khalifah, although he has to be under his command.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 34: Procedures of the appointment of the Caliph

Article 34: The method of appointing the Caliph (Khalifah)is the pledge of allegiance (Bay’a). The practical steps to appoint the Caliph (Khalifah)and his Bay’a are: The Madhalim court announces the vacancy of the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) The temporary leader takes control of his responsibility and announces the opening of the nomination procedure immediately Applications of the… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 149: The permanent sources of income for Bayt Al-Mal

Article 149: The permanent sources of income for the Bayt Al-Mal are the booty, Jizya, land tax, a fifth of buried treasure, and Zakah. This income is collected continuously irrespective of whether there was a need or not. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 86: Deputies of the Muhtasib

Article 86: The Muhtasib has the right to appoint deputies for him. They should fulfil the requirements of the Muhtasib, and he is allowed to assign them to different places. Those deputies would have the power to carry out the duties of the Hisbah in the areas to which they have been assigned, and in the cases for which they have been delegated. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 167: The currency of the State is gold and silver

Article 167: The currency of the State is to be restricted to gold and silver, whether minted or not. No other form of currency for the State is permitted. The State can issue something as a substitute for gold or silver provided that the Bayt Al-Mal has the equivalent amount of gold and silver to cover the issued coinage. Thus, the State may issue coinage in its name from brass, bronze or paper… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 56: Powers of provincial assembly

Article 56: Every province has an assembly elected from its people and championed by the governor. The assembly has the authority to participate in expressing opinions on administrative matters and not on ruling; and this would be for two objectives: Firstly - providing the necessary information about the situation of the governorate and its needs to the governor and to express their opinion… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 54: Powers of governor

Article 54: The governor has the mandatory powers of ruling and responsibility over the tasks of the departments in his governorship as a delegate of the Khalifah, so he has all the powers in his province that the assistant has in the State. He has leadership over the people of his province and control over everything that is connected with it apart from the finances, judiciary and Army. However,… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 114: Men and women, the rights and duties

Article 114: The woman has been given the same rights as man, and whatever was oblied upon man is also obliged upon the woman, except that which was specified for her or him by the Shari’ah evidences. Accordingly, she has the right to partake in trade, agriculture and industry, and to undertake contracts and transactions, to possess all forms of property, to invest her wealth whether personally… more