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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Governors

Article 58: Moving governor from province to another

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 58: The governor is not moved from one province to another, since his appointment was for a general control in a specific area. Therefore, he has to be discharged first and then reappointed.

Its proof is the action of the Messenger  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم since he  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to remove the governors and it is not narrated that he transferred a governor from place to place. Additionally, the governorship is one of the contracts that is completed by a direct wording, and the contract of the governorship is upon the province or city, which specifies the place where the governor rules, and the powers of ruling remain with him as long as the Khalifah does not remove him. So if he is not removed, then he remains a governor over it, and if he is transferred to another place, he is not removed from his first location by this transfer and is not appointed over the location that he has been transferred to, since his separation from the first location requires a direct word that he has been removed from the governorship over it and his appointment over the place that he has been transferred to requires a new contract of appointment which is specific to that location. Accordingly, it is taken that the governor is not transferred from location to location by transfer; rather he is removed from a location and appointed to a new governorship for the new location.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 93: The right to appoint proxy in the disputes and defence

Article 93: Every person has the right to appoint whomsoever he wishes as a proxy (Wakeel) for oneself in the disputes and defence, irrespective of whether he is Muslim or not, male or female. There is no distinction in this matter between the commissioner and the proxy. The proxy is permitted to be appointed for a fee according to the terms agreed upon with the commissioner. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 26: The right to elect the Caliph

Article 26: Every sane, adult Muslim, a male or a female, has the right to elect the leader of the State and to give him the pledge of allegiance; while the non-Muslims do not have such right. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 34: Procedures of the appointment of the Caliph

Article 34: The method of appointing the Caliph (Khalifah)is the pledge of allegiance (Bay’a). The practical steps to appoint the Caliph (Khalifah)and his Bay’a are: The Madhalim court announces the vacancy of the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) The temporary leader takes control of his responsibility and announces the opening of the nomination procedure immediately Applications of the… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 10: No clergymen in Islam. Islam is responsibility of all Muslims

Article 10: All the Muslims should bear the responsibility of Islam. There are no clergymen in Islam and the State should prohibit any sign of their presence among the Muslims. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 119: Prohibition of all that what threatens to undermine morality or society.

Article 119: It is prohibited for any man or woman to undertake any work which could undermine the morals, or causes corruption in the society. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 105: Ummah Council, Provincial Councils

Article 105: The individuals who represent the Muslims’ views to the Khalifah are the Ummah Council, and the individuals who represent the people in the provinces are the Provincial Councils. It is permitted for non-Muslims to be members in the Shura council for the sake of raising any complaints against any oppression by the rulers or misapplication of the laws of Islam. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 125: Guarantee the satisfaction of needs

Article 125: It is obligatory to guarantee that all the basic needs are met for everyone, and are completely met on an individual basis, and to guarantee that every individual is facilitated to satisfy the extra needs (non-essential needs) to the highest level possible. more