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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, the Caliph

Article 28: The position of Caliph

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 28: No one can be Khalifa unless the Muslims appoint him, and no one possesses the mandatory powers of the leadership of the State unless the contract with him has been concluded according tothe Shari’ah, like any contract in Islam.

Article 28: No one can be Caliph (Khalifa, Khaleefah) unless the Muslims appoint him, and no one possesses the mandatory powers of the leadership of the State unless the contract with him has been concluded according tothe Shari’ah, like any contract in Islam.

The evidence is that the Caliphate (Khilafah) is a contract upon satisfaction and consent, since its reality as a contract means it is not contracted except through two contracting parties, and ,therefore, no one is the Caliph unless he was appointed to it by those whose agreement completes theconclusion of the contract according to the Shari’ah. So if someone appoints himself Caliph without the pledge from those whom the Caliphate is contracted through, then he would not be a Caliph until his pledge occurs with choice and consent from those whom the conclusion of the contract takes place. So the fact that the Caliphate is a contract necessitates the presence of two contracting parties, with each of them having the necessary Shari’ah qualifications to be entrusted with the contract and conclude it.

If a conqueror came about and took the ruling by force he does not become a Caliph by that, even if he announces himself as Caliphof the Muslims, since the Caliphate was not contracted to him by the Muslims. If he took the pledge of allegiance from the people by force and compulsion, he does not become the Calipheven if he was given the pledge, since the pledge given through compulsion and force is not considered, and so the Caliphate cannot be contracted by it. This is because a contract of choice and consent cannot be completed through compulsion and force, and so it is not contracted except through a pledge given with satisfaction and consent. However, if this conqueror managed to convince the people that it was in the benefit of the Muslims to give him the pledge, and that the implementation of the Shari’ah would be complete through giving the pledge to him – and so the people became convinced and satisfied with that and gave him the pledge of allegiance on that basis with their own choice, then he would become the Caliphfrom the moment that he was given that pledge by the people freely even though he took the authority through force and power. Therefore, the condition is the contracting of the pledge, and this is only reached through consent and choice, irrespective of whether the one who reached it was the ruler and leader, or wasn’t.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 4: What may and what may not be adopted

Article 4: The Khalifah does not adopt any specific Shari’ah rule in matters related to rituals (‘Ibadaat) except in Zakat and Jihad, and whatever is necessary to protect the unity of the Muslims, and nor does he adopt any thought from among the thoughts related to the Islamic 'Aqeedah. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 124: The primary economic problem

Article 124: The primary economic problem is the distribution of wealth and benefits to all of the subjects of the State, and facilitating their utilisation of this wealth and benefits, by enabling them to strive for them and possess them. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 123: The management of the economy

Article 123: The management of the economy is to take in consideration the viewpoint about the targeted society when considering the fulfilment of the needs. So what the society ought to be should be made the basis for the fulfilment of the needs. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 38: Powers and Conditions for care for parishioners

Article 38: The Caliph (Khalifah) has the complete right to govern the affairs of the subjects according to his opinion and Ijtihad. He can adopt anything of the permitted issues that he needs to run the affairs of the State and to manage the peoples’ affairs and he is not permitted to contradict any Shari’ah rule for the sake of benefit. For example, he cannot prohibit the single family from… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 122: Custody of children

Article 122: Custody of the child is a right and duty upon the mother, irrespective of whether she is a Muslim or not as long as the child needs this care. If the child no longer needs the care, then the situation is examined. If both of the parents are Muslim then the child, whether boy or girl, chooses whomever they would like to live with, and they will join whomever they choose, irrespective… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 186: Greatness of the Islamic thoughts

Article 186: One of the most important political methods is the manifestation of the greatness of the Islamic thoughts in governing the affairs of individuals, nations and states. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 60: Examination of governors and their actions

Article 60: The Khalifah must examine the actions of the governors and continually assess their performance strictly. He must deputise people to monitor their situations, investigate them, and periodically gather all or some of them, and listen to the complaints of the subjects regarding them. more