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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Economic System

Article 130: The state property

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 130: State property is every wealth whose expenditure is determined by the opinion and Ijtihadof the Caliph (Khalifah), such as the wealth derived from taxes, land tax and Jizya.

Its evidence is that the Shari’ah evidences indicated that the definition of State property is the permission of the Legislator (swt) for the Caliph (Khalifah) to spend the wealth according to his opinion and Ijtihad. The Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to spend the wealth from the war booty according to his opinion and Ijtihad, and likewise the wealth from the Jizya and land taxes which were collected from the different lands. There is a Shari’ah text which shows that it was left to the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم to spend it according to how he صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم saw fit, which is an evidence that the Imam can spend this wealth according to his opinion and Ijtihad, since the action of the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم is a Shari’ah evidence and so it is a permission for the Imam to spend this wealth as he sees fit according to his opinion and Ijtihad. Therefore, that is the definition of State property.

For this reason, the expenditure of the Zakah has not been left to the Caliph (Khalifah)to decide according to his opinion and Ijtihad, rather the categories it can be spent upon have been specified and the State is the guardian over spending it in those areas, and so the Khalifah cannot increase the categories according to his opinion and Ijtihad.

Based upon this, if there is a Shari’ah text reported that permits the Imam to spend specific wealth according to his opinion and Ijtihad, then that wealth is considered to be the State’s wealth, and the text of the Legislator (swt) is a permission for the Imam to spend it according to his opinion and Ijtihad. Accordingly, the wealth of war booty, land taxes, Jizya and anything similar from taxes, and the returns from the State properties, is all State wealth. The definition which was deduced from the actions of the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم , and the generality of the texts which came ordering the utilisation of this wealth, apply upon all of the aforementioned issues. This article was drafted upon this basis.

This is the definition for every category of property, and these are the evidences that each of these definitions was deduced from. By examining these definitions which were drafted regarding ownership, and the evidences which they were deduced from, it becomes clear that property falls under one of the following three categories: private property, public property and State property. As for the wealth from Zakah, this is not possessed by any specific person, rather it is possessed by specific sections, and so it is considered to be from the category of private property, since the Legislator (swt) permitted those sections to possess it through the conveyance of the one giving it, irrespective of whether that was the one giving the Zakah directly or the Imam, and for that reason it is not considered to be a fourth category of property. Accordingly, property is categorised according to these three categories, and the details of the Shari’ah evidence for article 127 have been made clear.

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Article 86: Deputies of the Muhtasib

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Article 105: Ummah Council, Provincial Councils

Article 105: The individuals who represent the Muslims’ views to the Khalifah are the Ummah Council, and the individuals who represent the people in the provinces are the Provincial Councils. It is permitted for non-Muslims to be members in the Shura council for the sake of raising any complaints against any oppression by the rulers or misapplication of the laws of Islam. more
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Article 8: Arabic, language of Islam and State

Article 8: The Arabic language is exclusively the language of Islam and it is the only language used by the State. more
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Article 132: Spending and investment of property restricted by the Shari’ah

Article 132: The disposal of property is restricted by the permission of the Legislator (swt), for both of spending and investment. Squandering, extravagance and miserliness are all forbidden. Capitalist companies, co-operatives and any other type of transactions which contradict the Shari’ah are forbidden. Interest, fraud, monopolies, gambling and anything similar are all forbidden. more
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Article 138: Property of Factories

Article 138: Factories by their nature are private property. However, they follow the rule of the product that they are producing. If the product is private property then the factory is considered to be private property, such as textile factories. If the product is public property then the factory is considered public property, such as factories for iron ore production. more