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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Economic System

Article 139: The private property is protected

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 139: The State is not permitted to transfer private property into public property, since public property is confirmed by the nature and characteristic of wealth and not by the opinion of the State.

The evidence are the words from the agreed upon narration of the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم through Abu Bakra:

«إِنَّ دِمَاءَكُمْ وَأَمْوَالَكُمْ وَأَعْرَاضَكُمْ عَلَيْكُمْ حَرَامٌ كَحُرْمَةِ يَوْمِكُمْ هَذَا فِي بَلَدِكُمْ هَذَا فِي شَهْرِكُمْ هَذَا...»

No doubt! Your blood, your properties, and your honor are sacred to one another like the sanctity of this day of yours, in this (sacred) town (Mecca) of yours, in this month of yours”, which is general and encompasses every person, and so it is forbidden to take the wealth of any individual, whether Muslim or not, except for a legislated reason. Therefore, it is forbidden for the State to take the wealth of any individual except for a Shari’ah reason. Accordingly, it is forbidden for the State to take the wealth of any individual into its possession on the grounds of benefit, or to make it public property for the benefit of the Ummah, since the narration forbade that and benefit does not make it permitted, as its permission would require a Shari’ah evidence. It cannot be said that the Imam can do that as part of governing the interests of the Ummah since he has the right to manage the affairs. This is because the management of the affairs is the undertaking of the interests of the people according to the Shari’ah rules, and not the undertaking of the peoples’ interests according to the opinion of the Khalifah, and so the Khalifah has no power at all to permit whatever Allah (swt) forbade, and if he did so the action would be considered an injustice which he would be taken to court for, and the wealth would be returned to its owner.

Based upon this, what is called nationalisation is not from the Shari’ah in any shape or form, since if a property had the nature and characteristic of public property then it would be obligatory upon the State to make it part of the public property, and it would have no choice in that, and so this would not be considered nationalisation but rather the nature and characteristic of the property meant that it was in reality part of the public property, and it would be forbidden for the State to allow it to be privately owned. As for if the property was owned by an individual and did not have the characteristic or nature of public property, then it would be forbidden for the State to nationalise it, and if it did so it would be taken to court and the property would be returned to its owner. This is since the Messenger of Allah صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم took the salted land back from Abyad Bin Hammal after he  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم had granted it to him, once it became apparent that it was not depleted.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 175: Islamic culture is mandatory in all levels of education

Article 175: The Islamic culture must be taught at all levels of education. In higher education, departments should be assigned to the various Islamic disciplines as will be done with medicine, engineering, physics and anything similar. more
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Article 28: The position of Caliph

Article 28: No one can be Khalifa unless the Muslims appoint him, and no one possesses the mandatory powers of the leadership of the State unless the contract with him has been concluded according tothe Shari’ah, like any contract in Islam. more
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Article 130: The state property

Article 130: State property is every wealth whose expenditure is determined by the opinion and Ijtihadof the Caliph (Khalifah), such as the wealth derived from taxes, land tax and Jizya. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 75: The Judiciary

Article 75: The Judiciary is the pronouncement of the rule that becomes binding. It settles the disputes between the people and prevents that which harms the community’s rights, or it eliminates the disputes arising between people and members of the ruling system – both rulers and civil servants – from the Head of State downwards. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 171:The education policy

Article 171:The education policy is to form the Islamic mentality and disposition. Therefore, all subjects in the curriculum must be chosen on this basis. more
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Article 48: Responsibility of delegated assistants

Article 48: None of the delegated assistants (Tafwid) specialises in a specific department from the departments of the administrative institution, rather his responsibility is general, since those who undertake the administrative affairs are employees (civil servants) and not rulers, while the delegated assistant is a ruler. He is not entrusted with a specific authority in any of the tasks since… more
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Article 42: The Delegated assistant

Article 42: The Khalifah appoints a delegated assistant or more for himself, who carry the responsibilities of ruling. So he delegates to them the management of affairs, where they conduct them according to their opinion and Ijtihad. On the death of the Khalifah, the role of his assistants ends, and they do not continue in their work except for the period of the temporary leader. more