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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Economic System

Article 139: The private property is protected

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 139: The State is not permitted to transfer private property into public property, since public property is confirmed by the nature and characteristic of wealth and not by the opinion of the State.

The evidence are the words from the agreed upon narration of the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم through Abu Bakra:

«إِنَّ دِمَاءَكُمْ وَأَمْوَالَكُمْ وَأَعْرَاضَكُمْ عَلَيْكُمْ حَرَامٌ كَحُرْمَةِ يَوْمِكُمْ هَذَا فِي بَلَدِكُمْ هَذَا فِي شَهْرِكُمْ هَذَا...»

No doubt! Your blood, your properties, and your honor are sacred to one another like the sanctity of this day of yours, in this (sacred) town (Mecca) of yours, in this month of yours”, which is general and encompasses every person, and so it is forbidden to take the wealth of any individual, whether Muslim or not, except for a legislated reason. Therefore, it is forbidden for the State to take the wealth of any individual except for a Shari’ah reason. Accordingly, it is forbidden for the State to take the wealth of any individual into its possession on the grounds of benefit, or to make it public property for the benefit of the Ummah, since the narration forbade that and benefit does not make it permitted, as its permission would require a Shari’ah evidence. It cannot be said that the Imam can do that as part of governing the interests of the Ummah since he has the right to manage the affairs. This is because the management of the affairs is the undertaking of the interests of the people according to the Shari’ah rules, and not the undertaking of the peoples’ interests according to the opinion of the Khalifah, and so the Khalifah has no power at all to permit whatever Allah (swt) forbade, and if he did so the action would be considered an injustice which he would be taken to court for, and the wealth would be returned to its owner.

Based upon this, what is called nationalisation is not from the Shari’ah in any shape or form, since if a property had the nature and characteristic of public property then it would be obligatory upon the State to make it part of the public property, and it would have no choice in that, and so this would not be considered nationalisation but rather the nature and characteristic of the property meant that it was in reality part of the public property, and it would be forbidden for the State to allow it to be privately owned. As for if the property was owned by an individual and did not have the characteristic or nature of public property, then it would be forbidden for the State to nationalise it, and if it did so it would be taken to court and the property would be returned to its owner. This is since the Messenger of Allah صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم took the salted land back from Abyad Bin Hammal after he  صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم had granted it to him, once it became apparent that it was not depleted.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 122: Custody of children

Article 122: Custody of the child is a right and duty upon the mother, irrespective of whether she is a Muslim or not as long as the child needs this care. If the child no longer needs the care, then the situation is examined. If both of the parents are Muslim then the child, whether boy or girl, chooses whomever they would like to live with, and they will join whomever they choose, irrespective… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 36: The powers of the Caliph

Article 36: The Caliph (Khalifah) possesses the following powers: He is the one who adopts the Shari’ah rules derived by a correct Ijtihadfrom the Book of Allah (swt) and the Sunnah of his Messengernecessary for managing the affairs of the Ummah so that they become laws (Qawanin) which are obligatory to obey, and it is not permitted to oppose them. He is responsible for governing the domestic and… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 190: Provisions of the treaties

Article 190:All military treaties and pacts (with other States) are completely prohibited, along with anything of their type, or connected to them such as political treaties and agreements covering the leasing of military bases and airfields. It is permitted to conclude good neighbour relations, economic, commercial, financial, cultural and armistice treaties. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 142: Hoarding of wealth is prohibited

Article 142: Hoarding of wealth is prohibited, even if Zakah is paid upon it. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 52: Administrative division of the country

Article 52: The lands which are ruled by the State are divided into units, where each unit is called a Wilayah (province). Each province is divided into units and each unit is called an ’Imalah (district). The one who governs the province is called the Wali (governor) or Amir and the one who governs the ’Imalah is called the ’Aamil (worker) or Hakim (ruler). more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 76: The supreme judge

Article 76: The Khalifah appoints a supreme judge to the judiciary from the male, adult, free, Muslim, sane, just people who know jurisprudence, and if he was given the power to appoint and remove the Madhalim judge, and had the power of judgement in the Madhalim, then he would have to be a Mujtahid. He would have the power to appoint judges, discipline them, and remove them as part of the… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 124: The primary economic problem

Article 124: The primary economic problem is the distribution of wealth and benefits to all of the subjects of the State, and facilitating their utilisation of this wealth and benefits, by enabling them to strive for them and possess them. more