nusr-khilafah-en

Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Economic System

Article 147: Conditions of taxation

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 147: The State has the right to impose taxes in order to undertake anything that the Shari’ah obligated upon the Ummah if the funds in the Bayt Al-Mal were insufficient since the obligation for funding it would be transferred onto the Ummah. The State has no right to impose a tax for the sake of whatever is not obligatory upon the Ummah to undertake, and so it is not permitted to collect fees for the courts or departments or to fulfil any service.

 

The evidence for this is the same evidence that was mentioned for the first issue of the last article (Article 146), in that the Shari’ah defined the general income, and that the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم did not impose taxes and forbade the taking of custom duties, because it is a tax, and so it is a prohibition that encompasses every tax. It also mentioned that if there was no wealth in the Bayt Al-Mal to spend upon whatever the Shari’ah obligated upon the Bayt Al-Mal and the Ummah, the obligation transfers onto the Ummah, and whatever the Shari’ah obligated upon the Bayt Al-Mal alone then its obligation does not transfer on to the Ummah even if there was nothing left in the Bayt Al-Mal for it, rather it is delayed until the money for it is found and no taxes are imposed upon the Ummah. In the same way, no taxes are directly imposed upon the Ummah for the sake of anything that was not obligatory upon it, and similarly indirect taxes are also not imposed; so no fees are collected for the courts, or the departments, or import stamps, or permit fees, or anything similar. As for postal stamps, they are not considered to be indirect taxes, but rather they are the price for transporting letters, which is permitted. Therefore, no indirect tax for the sake of anything which the Shari’ah did not obligate upon the Muslims should be collected, since they are just like the direct taxes without any difference between them, and it is not permitted to impose them upon the Ummah.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 44: Empowering of delegated assistant

Article 44:It is a condition for the empowering of a delegated assistant (Tafwid), that his empowerment encompasses two issues: The first being general responsibility, and the second being the representation. Accordingly, it is necessary for the Khalifah to say to him “I appoint you on my behalf as my deputy” or anything that is of a similar meaning from the wordings that encompass the general… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 154: Employees are equal, regardless of the employer

Article 154: Company employees and those employed by individuals have the same rights and duties as employees of the State. Everyone who works for a wage, irrespective of the nature of the work, is considered an employee. In matters of dispute between employers and employees over salary levels, the salary level is to be assessed on the basis of the market. If they disagree over something else,… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 52: Administrative division of the country

Article 52: The lands which are ruled by the State are divided into units, where each unit is called a Wilayah (province). Each province is divided into units and each unit is called an ’Imalah (district). The one who governs the province is called the Wali (governor) or Amir and the one who governs the ’Imalah is called the ’Aamil (worker) or Hakim (ruler). more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 139: The private property is protected

Article 139: The State is not permitted to transfer private property into public property, since public property is confirmed by the nature and characteristic of wealth and not by the opinion of the State. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 116: The woman and ruling positions

Article 116: It is not permitted for a woman to take a ruling position; so she cannot be a Khalifah, nor an assistant, governor or ‘Amil, nor undertake any action considered to be ruling. In the same manner she cannot be the head judge and nor a judge in the Madhalim court, nor the Amir of Jihad. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 71: The police (Shurtah)

Article 71: The police (Shurtah) have two branches: the military police, who are under the command of the Amir of Jihad, in other words, the war department, and the police who are under the control of the Ruler to protect the security, and they are under the authority of the Department of Internal Security. The two branches have specific training and specific culture in order for them to carry… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 57 : Term of office for the governor

Article 57: The governor’s term of office in a particular province is not to be long. He must be discharged whenever he becomes firmly established in his province or the people become enchanted with him. more

Method of Establishing the Caliphate and the Dominant Sultan

There are some comments that state: " the method of seeking the Nussrah (material support) to establish the Khilafah is not the only legitimate way, there is another method, which is "the method of…

Regarding Declaration of ISIS the Establishment of the Caliphate (Khilafah)

To all the brothers and sisters who sent inquiries about the declaration of the organization's ISIS establishment of the Caliphate State... The matter of the Islamic Caliphate is great and its matter…