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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State/ Ummah Council

Article 105: Ummah Council, Provincial Councils

The Constitution of the Caliphate StateArticle 105: The individuals who represent the Muslims’ views to the Khalifah are the Ummah Council, and the individuals who represent the people in the provinces are the Provincial Councils. It is permitted for non-Muslims to be members in the Shura council for the sake of raising any complaints against any oppression by the rulers or misapplication of the laws of Islam.

This is a Council formed by individuals representing the opinion of the Muslims at large, to which the Khalifah can refer to, in order to consult on various issues. They in turn are the representatives of the Ummah in holding the rulers accountable. This is deduced from the Messenger of Allah’s صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم consultation with some men from the Ansar and the emigrants who represented their people. It is also derived from the Messenger’s صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم assigning some of his companions for consultation (Shura). He used to refer to them more than others for seeking opinion, such as Abu Bakr (ra), Umar (ra), Hamza (ra), ‘Ali (ra), Salman Al-Farisi (ra), Hudhayfah (ra)….

It is also deduced from the fact that Abu Bakr (ra) designated some men from the Muhajir and the Ansar for seeking their opinion when something happened. The people of the consultation (Shura) at the time of Abu Bakr (ra) were the scholars and the people capable of giving legal edicts. Ibn Sa’ad reported from Al-Qasim:

«أن أبا بكر الصديق كان إذا نزل به أمر يريد مشاورة أهل الرأي وأهل الفقه فيه، دعا رجالاً من المهاجرين والأنصار، دعا عمر، وعثمان، وعلياً، وعبد الرحمن بن عوف، ومعاذ بن جبل، وأُبَيّ بن كعب، وزيد بن ثابت، وكل هؤلاء كان يُفْتي في خلافة أبي بكر، وإنما تصير فتوى الناس إلى هؤلاء، فمضى أبو بكر على ذلك، ثم وَلِيَ عمرُ فكان يدعو هؤلاء النَّفَرَ»

when something happened and Abu Bakr wanted to consult the people of opinion and the people of jurisprudence, he called from the emigrants and the Ansar. Umar, ‘Uthman, ‘Ali, ‘Abd Al-Rahman b. ‘Awf, Mu’adh b Jabal, ‘Ubay b. Ka‘b and Zayd Bin Thabit. They all used to give their opinion during the Khilafah of Abu Bakr. People would also take their legal edicts (fatwa) from them. When Umar became Khalifah, he also called these people. There are also evidences that call upon the Muslims to account the rulers. Muslims exercised such accounting as happened at the time of the Righteous Khulafaa’. As the Ummah is allowed to be represented in consultation (Shura), she is also allowed to be represented in accounting. All of this indicates that it is allowed to have a special council that represents the Ummah in accounting and in the consultation that is established by the text of the Quran and Sunnah. It is called the Ummah Council because it represents the Ummah in consultation and accounting.

It is permitted for non-Muslim citizens to be members of the Council, in order to file complaints against any injustice perpetrated against them by the rulers or against any misimplementation of Islam upon them or the lack of services to them or the like.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 156: The state guarantees the expense for the needy

Article 156:The State has to guarantee the living expenses of the one who has no money, no work and no relatives responsible for his financial maintenance. The State is responsible for housing and maintaining the disabled and handicapped people. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 45 :Work of delegated assistant

Article 45 :The work of the assistant is to report to the Khalifah after whatever he has executed of the actions of management, and whatever he implemented of government and guardianship, in order that his powers do not become like that of the Khalifah. Therefore, his work is to raise his reports and to implement whatever he is ordered to. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 174: Empirical- and the cultural sciences

Article 174: A distinction should be drawn between the empirical sciences such as mathematics on the one hand and the cultural sciences on the other. The empirical sciences and all that is related to them are taught according to the need and are not restricted to any stage of education. As for the cultural sciences, they are taught at the primary and secondary levels according to a specific… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 44: Empowering of delegated assistant

Article 44:It is a condition for the empowering of a delegated assistant (Tafwid), that his empowerment encompasses two issues: The first being general responsibility, and the second being the representation. Accordingly, it is necessary for the Khalifah to say to him “I appoint you on my behalf as my deputy” or anything that is of a similar meaning from the wordings that encompass the general… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 37: Terms and conditions of the adoption of Shari’ah rules

Article 37: The Caliph (Khalifah)’s adoption is restricted by the Shari’ah rules; he is prohibited to adopt any rule which is not derived according to a legitimate deduction from the Shari’ah evidences, and he is restricted with what he adopted of the rules, and by what he bound himself to with respect to the method of derivation. So he is not permitted to adopt a rule which has been derived… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 131: Private property consisting five means:

Article 131: Private property consisting of liquid and fixed assets is restricted to the following five Shari’ah means: Work Inheritance The need of wealth for the sake of living Donation from the wealth of the State to its subjects Funds taken by individuals without any effort or purchase more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 54: Powers of governor

Article 54: The governor has the mandatory powers of ruling and responsibility over the tasks of the departments in his governorship as a delegate of the Khalifah, so he has all the powers in his province that the assistant has in the State. He has leadership over the people of his province and control over everything that is connected with it apart from the finances, judiciary and Army. However,… more