nusr-khilafah-en

Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 88: Appointment and accountability of the judge of Madhalim

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 88: The judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. His accounting, discipline and removal are done by the Khalifah or by the Supreme Judge if the Khalifah had given him the powers to do so. However he cannot be removed during his investigation of a Madhlamah against the Khalifah, or the executive assistants, or the Supreme Judge; rather the power to remove him in these circumstances is for the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim).

The judge of Madhalim is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. This is because the Madhalim is part of the judiciary, for they are the conveying of the Shari’ah rule by way of enforcement, and all the types of judges must be appointed by the Khalifah. This is confirmed by the Messenger of Allah’s صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم actions since he صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to appoint the judges as was explained previously. All this means that it is the Khalifah who appoints the judge of Madhalim, yet the Supreme Judge could appoint the judge of Madhalim if the Khalifah made provisions for this in his appointment clause. It is allowed for the main court of injustices (Mahkamat Al-Madhalim) in the centre of the State to examine only the Madhalim that occurred from the Khalifah, his assistants and the Supreme Judge. However, the branches of the court of injustices in the provinces examine the Madhalim that occur from the governors and the other State employees. The Khalifah has the right to give the Central Court of Injustices the authority of appointment and removal of the Madhalim judges in the branch Madhalim courts that come under its authority in the provinces.

The Khalifah is the one that appoints and removes the members of the main court of injustices in the centre of the State. As for the removal of the head of the central court of injustices - in other words, the Madhalim judge responsible in examining the removal of the Khalifah - it should in principle be the right of the Khalifah to remove him, as it is he who has the right to appoint him like all the judges. However, it is possible, if the power of removing the judge were left to the Khalifah during a case, then this power would lead to something prohibited. In such a situation the principle of

(الوسيلة إلى الحرام حرام)

the means to something forbidden is also forbidden”

would apply. The strong likelihood of such a scenario arising is enough for applying this principle.

This situation is when there is a case against the Khalifah or his assistants or his Supreme Judge (in case the Khalifah was given the mandatory power of appointing and removing the Madhalim judge). This is because keeping the mandatory power of removing the Madhalim judge in the hands of the Khalifah in this case would influence the verdict by the judge and accordingly it would limit the capability of the judge to remove the Khalifah or his assistants if deemed necessary. This mandatory power of removing the judge in this case is a means for Haram, or in other words, leaving it in the hand of the Khalifah in this case is prohibited.

As for the remaining cases, the rule remains as it is; in other words, the power of removing the Madhalim judge is left to the Khalifah, just like his appointment.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 104: Permission for media

Article 104: The media owned by any citizen of the State does not require a permit; rather they are simply required to inform the media office, such that the office knows about the media means that are being established. The owner and the editors of any media means are responsible for every article they publish and are accounted for anything which contradicts the Shari’ah in the same manner as… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 23:The state apparatus

Article 23: The state apparatus is established upon thirteen institutions: The Khalifah (Leader of the State) The Assistants (delegated ministers) Executive minister The Governors The Amir of Jihad The Internal Security The Foreign Affairs Industry The Judiciary The People’s Affairs (administrative apparatus) The Treasury (Bayt Al-Mal) Media The Ummah’s Council (Shura and accounting) more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 101: The civil servants

Article 101: The civil servants other than the managers are appointed, transferred, suspended, disciplined, and removed by the one who is in charge of the departments, administrations or divisions. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 141: Protection of public property for public interest

Article 141: The State is allowed to protect some of the dead land and any part of public property for any public interest. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 96: Management of government’s and people’s affairs

Article 96: Management of the government’s and people’s affairs is carried out by offices, departments, and administrations, whose task is to ensure the management of the State’s business and the carrying out of the people’s interests. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 71: The police (Shurtah)

Article 71: The police (Shurtah) have two branches: the military police, who are under the command of the Amir of Jihad, in other words, the war department, and the police who are under the control of the Ruler to protect the security, and they are under the authority of the Department of Internal Security. The two branches have specific training and specific culture in order for them to carry… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 54: Powers of governor

Article 54: The governor has the mandatory powers of ruling and responsibility over the tasks of the departments in his governorship as a delegate of the Khalifah, so he has all the powers in his province that the assistant has in the State. He has leadership over the people of his province and control over everything that is connected with it apart from the finances, judiciary and Army. However,… more