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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 88: Appointment and accountability of the judge of Madhalim

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 88: The judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. His accounting, discipline and removal are done by the Khalifah or by the Supreme Judge if the Khalifah had given him the powers to do so. However he cannot be removed during his investigation of a Madhlamah against the Khalifah, or the executive assistants, or the Supreme Judge; rather the power to remove him in these circumstances is for the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim).

The judge of Madhalim is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. This is because the Madhalim is part of the judiciary, for they are the conveying of the Shari’ah rule by way of enforcement, and all the types of judges must be appointed by the Khalifah. This is confirmed by the Messenger of Allah’s صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم actions since he صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to appoint the judges as was explained previously. All this means that it is the Khalifah who appoints the judge of Madhalim, yet the Supreme Judge could appoint the judge of Madhalim if the Khalifah made provisions for this in his appointment clause. It is allowed for the main court of injustices (Mahkamat Al-Madhalim) in the centre of the State to examine only the Madhalim that occurred from the Khalifah, his assistants and the Supreme Judge. However, the branches of the court of injustices in the provinces examine the Madhalim that occur from the governors and the other State employees. The Khalifah has the right to give the Central Court of Injustices the authority of appointment and removal of the Madhalim judges in the branch Madhalim courts that come under its authority in the provinces.

The Khalifah is the one that appoints and removes the members of the main court of injustices in the centre of the State. As for the removal of the head of the central court of injustices - in other words, the Madhalim judge responsible in examining the removal of the Khalifah - it should in principle be the right of the Khalifah to remove him, as it is he who has the right to appoint him like all the judges. However, it is possible, if the power of removing the judge were left to the Khalifah during a case, then this power would lead to something prohibited. In such a situation the principle of

(الوسيلة إلى الحرام حرام)

the means to something forbidden is also forbidden”

would apply. The strong likelihood of such a scenario arising is enough for applying this principle.

This situation is when there is a case against the Khalifah or his assistants or his Supreme Judge (in case the Khalifah was given the mandatory power of appointing and removing the Madhalim judge). This is because keeping the mandatory power of removing the Madhalim judge in the hands of the Khalifah in this case would influence the verdict by the judge and accordingly it would limit the capability of the judge to remove the Khalifah or his assistants if deemed necessary. This mandatory power of removing the judge in this case is a means for Haram, or in other words, leaving it in the hand of the Khalifah in this case is prohibited.

As for the remaining cases, the rule remains as it is; in other words, the power of removing the Madhalim judge is left to the Khalifah, just like his appointment.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 87: The judge of Madhalim (Injustices)

Article 87: The judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim)is appointed to remove all injustices which have been inflicted upon any person who lives under the authority of the State, irrespective of whether the person is from the subjects of the State or not, and irrespective of whether the injustice was committed by the Khalifah or anyone below him from the rulers and civil servants. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 161: Foreign trade is assessed on the basis of the citizenship

Article 161: Foreign trade is assessed on the basis of the citizenship of the trader and not the origin of the goods. Merchants from countries in a state of war with the State are prevented from trading in the State, unless given a special permission for the merchant or the goods. Merchants from countries that have treaties with the State are treated according to the terms of the treaties.… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 149: The permanent sources of income for Bayt Al-Mal

Article 149: The permanent sources of income for the Bayt Al-Mal are the booty, Jizya, land tax, a fifth of buried treasure, and Zakah. This income is collected continuously irrespective of whether there was a need or not. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 71: The police (Shurtah)

Article 71: The police (Shurtah) have two branches: the military police, who are under the command of the Amir of Jihad, in other words, the war department, and the police who are under the control of the Ruler to protect the security, and they are under the authority of the Department of Internal Security. The two branches have specific training and specific culture in order for them to carry… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 185: Political means

Article 185: Some of the most important political means are exposing the crimes of other states, demonstrating the danger of erroneous politics, exposing harmful conspiracies and undermining misleading personalities. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 55: Coordination between governor and Caliph

Article 55: The governor is not obliged to inform the Caliph (Khalifah) of what he has carried out within his authorised command. If a new problem arises which has no precedent, he has to inform the Khalifah about it first, and he then proceeds according to the instructions of the Khalifah. If he was afraid that the problem would be exacerbated if delayed, he carries out the action and then must… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 137: Categories of Public Ownership

Article 137: There are three categories of Public Ownership: a. Public utilities, such as the open spaces in the towns. b. Vast mineral resources, like oil fields. c. Things which, by their nature, preclude ownership by individuals, such as rivers. more