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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 88: Appointment and accountability of the judge of Madhalim

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 88: The judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. His accounting, discipline and removal are done by the Khalifah or by the Supreme Judge if the Khalifah had given him the powers to do so. However he cannot be removed during his investigation of a Madhlamah against the Khalifah, or the executive assistants, or the Supreme Judge; rather the power to remove him in these circumstances is for the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim).

The judge of Madhalim is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. This is because the Madhalim is part of the judiciary, for they are the conveying of the Shari’ah rule by way of enforcement, and all the types of judges must be appointed by the Khalifah. This is confirmed by the Messenger of Allah’s صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم actions since he صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to appoint the judges as was explained previously. All this means that it is the Khalifah who appoints the judge of Madhalim, yet the Supreme Judge could appoint the judge of Madhalim if the Khalifah made provisions for this in his appointment clause. It is allowed for the main court of injustices (Mahkamat Al-Madhalim) in the centre of the State to examine only the Madhalim that occurred from the Khalifah, his assistants and the Supreme Judge. However, the branches of the court of injustices in the provinces examine the Madhalim that occur from the governors and the other State employees. The Khalifah has the right to give the Central Court of Injustices the authority of appointment and removal of the Madhalim judges in the branch Madhalim courts that come under its authority in the provinces.

The Khalifah is the one that appoints and removes the members of the main court of injustices in the centre of the State. As for the removal of the head of the central court of injustices - in other words, the Madhalim judge responsible in examining the removal of the Khalifah - it should in principle be the right of the Khalifah to remove him, as it is he who has the right to appoint him like all the judges. However, it is possible, if the power of removing the judge were left to the Khalifah during a case, then this power would lead to something prohibited. In such a situation the principle of

(الوسيلة إلى الحرام حرام)

the means to something forbidden is also forbidden”

would apply. The strong likelihood of such a scenario arising is enough for applying this principle.

This situation is when there is a case against the Khalifah or his assistants or his Supreme Judge (in case the Khalifah was given the mandatory power of appointing and removing the Madhalim judge). This is because keeping the mandatory power of removing the Madhalim judge in the hands of the Khalifah in this case would influence the verdict by the judge and accordingly it would limit the capability of the judge to remove the Khalifah or his assistants if deemed necessary. This mandatory power of removing the judge in this case is a means for Haram, or in other words, leaving it in the hand of the Khalifah in this case is prohibited.

As for the remaining cases, the rule remains as it is; in other words, the power of removing the Madhalim judge is left to the Khalifah, just like his appointment.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 28: The position of Caliph

Article 28: No one can be Khalifa unless the Muslims appoint him, and no one possesses the mandatory powers of the leadership of the State unless the contract with him has been concluded according tothe Shari’ah, like any contract in Islam. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 120: Marital life

Article 120: Marital life is one of tranquillity; and the couple should live together as companions. The guardianship (Qawwamah) of the husband over the wife is a guardianship of care and not ruling. It has been made obligatory for her to obey him, and obligatory upon him to financially support her according to the expected standard of living of one like her. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 36: The powers of the Caliph

Article 36: The Caliph (Khalifah) possesses the following powers: He is the one who adopts the Shari’ah rules derived by a correct Ijtihadfrom the Book of Allah (swt) and the Sunnah of his Messengernecessary for managing the affairs of the Ummah so that they become laws (Qawanin) which are obligatory to obey, and it is not permitted to oppose them. He is responsible for governing the domestic and… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 8: Arabic, language of Islam and State

Article 8: The Arabic language is exclusively the language of Islam and it is the only language used by the State. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 138: Property of Factories

Article 138: Factories by their nature are private property. However, they follow the rule of the product that they are producing. If the product is private property then the factory is considered to be private property, such as textile factories. If the product is public property then the factory is considered public property, such as factories for iron ore production. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 150: When it's allowed taxes are levied?

Article 150: If the permanent revenues of the Bayt Al-Mal are not sufficient to cover the expenditure of the State, then it is possible to impose taxes upon the Muslims. It becomes obligatory to impose taxes as follows: a. To fulfil the obligatory expenses upon the Bayt Al-Mal for the poor, needy, and wayfarers, and to undertake the obligation of Jihad. b. To fulfil the obligatory expenses upon… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 191: Participation in organizations

Article 191: The State is forbidden to belong to any organisation which is based on anything other than Islam or which applies non-Islamic rules. This includes international organisations like the United Nations, the International Court of Justice, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and regional organisations like the Arab League. more