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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 88: Appointment and accountability of the judge of Madhalim

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 88: The judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. His accounting, discipline and removal are done by the Khalifah or by the Supreme Judge if the Khalifah had given him the powers to do so. However he cannot be removed during his investigation of a Madhlamah against the Khalifah, or the executive assistants, or the Supreme Judge; rather the power to remove him in these circumstances is for the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim).

The judge of Madhalim is appointed by the Khalifah, or by the Supreme Judge. This is because the Madhalim is part of the judiciary, for they are the conveying of the Shari’ah rule by way of enforcement, and all the types of judges must be appointed by the Khalifah. This is confirmed by the Messenger of Allah’s صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم actions since he صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم used to appoint the judges as was explained previously. All this means that it is the Khalifah who appoints the judge of Madhalim, yet the Supreme Judge could appoint the judge of Madhalim if the Khalifah made provisions for this in his appointment clause. It is allowed for the main court of injustices (Mahkamat Al-Madhalim) in the centre of the State to examine only the Madhalim that occurred from the Khalifah, his assistants and the Supreme Judge. However, the branches of the court of injustices in the provinces examine the Madhalim that occur from the governors and the other State employees. The Khalifah has the right to give the Central Court of Injustices the authority of appointment and removal of the Madhalim judges in the branch Madhalim courts that come under its authority in the provinces.

The Khalifah is the one that appoints and removes the members of the main court of injustices in the centre of the State. As for the removal of the head of the central court of injustices - in other words, the Madhalim judge responsible in examining the removal of the Khalifah - it should in principle be the right of the Khalifah to remove him, as it is he who has the right to appoint him like all the judges. However, it is possible, if the power of removing the judge were left to the Khalifah during a case, then this power would lead to something prohibited. In such a situation the principle of

(الوسيلة إلى الحرام حرام)

the means to something forbidden is also forbidden”

would apply. The strong likelihood of such a scenario arising is enough for applying this principle.

This situation is when there is a case against the Khalifah or his assistants or his Supreme Judge (in case the Khalifah was given the mandatory power of appointing and removing the Madhalim judge). This is because keeping the mandatory power of removing the Madhalim judge in the hands of the Khalifah in this case would influence the verdict by the judge and accordingly it would limit the capability of the judge to remove the Khalifah or his assistants if deemed necessary. This mandatory power of removing the judge in this case is a means for Haram, or in other words, leaving it in the hand of the Khalifah in this case is prohibited.

As for the remaining cases, the rule remains as it is; in other words, the power of removing the Madhalim judge is left to the Khalifah, just like his appointment.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 102: The treasury (Bayt Al-Mal)

Article 102: The treasury (Bayt Al-Mal) is the administration responsible for the revenues and expenditure in accordance with the Shari’ah rules in terms of their collection, storage and spending. The head of the office of the treasury is called the Treasurer of the Treasury (Khazin Bayt Al-Mal). The offices in the provinces fall under it and the head of each office is called the Trustee of the… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 38: Powers and Conditions for care for parishioners

Article 38: The Caliph (Khalifah) has the complete right to govern the affairs of the subjects according to his opinion and Ijtihad. He can adopt anything of the permitted issues that he needs to run the affairs of the State and to manage the peoples’ affairs and he is not permitted to contradict any Shari’ah rule for the sake of benefit. For example, he cannot prohibit the single family from… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 65: The Commander of army and military ranks

Article 65: The Khalifah is the Commander of the Army and he appoints the Chief of General Staff, a general for each brigade, and a commander for every division. The remaining ranks in the Army are appointed by the brigadiers and commanders. The appointment of a person in the General Staff is according to his level of military expertise and is carried out by the Chief of General Staff. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 52: Administrative division of the country

Article 52: The lands which are ruled by the State are divided into units, where each unit is called a Wilayah (province). Each province is divided into units and each unit is called an ’Imalah (district). The one who governs the province is called the Wali (governor) or Amir and the one who governs the ’Imalah is called the ’Aamil (worker) or Hakim (ruler). more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 14: Acts and things in terms of the Shari’ah

Article 14: Actions are originally bound by the Shari’ah rules. Hence, no action should be undertaken unless its rule is known. The things on the other side are originally Mubah (permitted) as long as there is no evidence that stipulates prohibition. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 46: Scrutiny of actions of delegated assistants

Article 46: It is imperative that the Khalifah scrutinises the actions of the delegated assistants (Tafwid) and their management of the affairs, in order to confirm what was right, and to correct any errors, since the management of the affairs of the Ummah has been delegated to the Khalifah and is decided by his Ijtihad. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 34: Procedures of the appointment of the Caliph

Article 34: The method of appointing the Caliph (Khalifah)is the pledge of allegiance (Bay’a). The practical steps to appoint the Caliph (Khalifah)and his Bay’a are: The Madhalim court announces the vacancy of the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) The temporary leader takes control of his responsibility and announces the opening of the nomination procedure immediately Applications of the… more