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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 84: The Muhtasib

 The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 84: The Muhtasib is the judge who investigates all cases, in the absence of an individual litigation, involving the rights of the public that do not involve the Hudud (proscribed punishments) and criminal acts.

This article is the definition for the judge of the Hisbah, and it is taken from the narration regarding the heap of the food, since the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم found dampness in the heap of the food and ordered that it should be placed on top of the food so that the people could see it. Accordingly, these were the general rights of the people that the Messenger صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم was looking into and judged upon by ordering the moist food to be placed on the top of the heap in order to remove any cheating. This encompasses all of the rights which are of this type, and does not encompass the Hudud and criminal acts, since they are not of this nature, and because the origin here is the disputed issues between people.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 144: The Jizya

Article 144:Jizya is collected from non-Muslims (people of Dhimma). It is to be taken from the adult men if they are capable of paying it, and it is not taken from women or children. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 33: The temporary Ameer

Article 33: A temporary leader is appointed to take charge of the affairs of the Muslims, and to prepare for the election of the new Caliph (Khalifah) after the vacation of the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) according to the following process: When the previous Caliph (Khalifah) feels that his life is coming to an end, or is committed to resigning, he has the right to appoint the temporary… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 75: The Judiciary

Article 75: The Judiciary is the pronouncement of the rule that becomes binding. It settles the disputes between the people and prevents that which harms the community’s rights, or it eliminates the disputes arising between people and members of the ruling system – both rulers and civil servants – from the Head of State downwards. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 147: Conditions of taxation

Article 147:The State has the right to impose taxes in order to undertake anything that the Shari’ah obligated upon the Ummah if the funds in the Bayt Al-Mal were insufficient since the obligation for funding it would be transferred onto the Ummah. The State has no right to impose a tax for the sake of whatever is not obligatory upon the Ummah to undertake, and so it is not permitted to collect… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 77: Types of judiciary

Article 77: The Judges are of three types: One is the Judge (Qadi), and he undertakes settling the disputes between people over transactions and penal codes. The second is the Muhtasib, who undertakes the settling of any breach of law that may harm the rights of the community. The third is the judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim), who undertakes the settling of disputes between the people… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 49: Department of executive assistant

Article 49: The Khalifah appoints assistants for implementation and their work is administrative. They are not rulers and their department is the institution that executes what the Khalifah issues in both of the internal and foreign affairs authorities and submits what comes to him from these authorities. The department is the intermediary between the Khalifah and others, conveying to and from… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 124: The primary economic problem

Article 124: The primary economic problem is the distribution of wealth and benefits to all of the subjects of the State, and facilitating their utilisation of this wealth and benefits, by enabling them to strive for them and possess them. more