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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 82: Permissible to vary the grades of courts

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 82: It is permissible to vary the grades of courts in respect to the type of cases. Some judges may thus be assigned to certain cases of particular grades and other courts to be authorised to judge the other cases.

Its evidence is that the judiciary is delegated by the Khalifah and it is just like proxy, with no difference between them.

The judiciary is one form of proxy, and it is permitted for proxy to be general or specific. Therefore, it would be permitted to appoint a judge to deal in specific cases only, and prohibited from dealing with any other ones. It is permitted to appoint another judge to look into all sorts of cases including those mentioned, even in the same location, or to look into cases other than those mentioned. Therefore, it is permitted to have various levels of courts, and Muslims had this in the first era.

Al-Mawardi wrote in his book entitled Al-AhkamAl-Sultaniyyah: “Abu ‘Abd Allah Al-Zubayr said: ‘The leaders here in Basra used to appoint a judge at the central mosque, and they called him the judge of the mosque. He used to judge in disputes involving amounts below twenty Dinars and two hundred Dirhams, and he used to impose maintenance (Nafaqah). He would not exceed his boundaries and nor the duties entrusted to him’”.The Messenger of Allah صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم delegated others on his behalf in the judiciary in a single case such as when he delegated Amr b. Al-‘As, and he صلى الله عليه وآله وسلمdelegated others on his behalf in the judiciary in all of the cases in a particular province as he did when he delegated ‘Ali b. Abi Talib (ra) over the judiciary in Yemen. This indicates that it is permitted to have a specific and general judiciary.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 64: Banners and flags of the army

Article 64: The Army is given banners and flags and the Head of State (the Khalifah) gives the banners to whomever he appoints to lead the Army, whereas the flags are provided by the brigadiers. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 41: The Decision about change and removal the Caliph

Article 41: The court of the Madhalim (injustices) is the only authority that can decide whether the change in the situation of the Caliph (Khalifah) removes him from the leadership or not, and it is the only authority that has the power to remove or warn him. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 94: Permissibility of power of attorney in private and public matters

Article 94: It is permitted for the one who has been vested with a specific responsibility, like a custodian or guardian, or general responsibility such as the Khalifah, ruler, civil servant, Muhtasib, or judge of the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim), to appoint a person to his position as a proxy - within the bounds of his authority – in disputes and defence alone, and there is no difference… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 143: The Zakah

Article 143: Zakah is collected from Muslims, and is taken from the wealth which the Shari’ah has specified such as money, the profits of trade, cattle and grains. It is not taken from anything which the Shari’ah did not mention. It is taken from every owner irrespective of whether they were legally responsible/accountable (Mukallaf) such as the mature, sane person or whether they were not… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 113: In origin men and women are segregated

Article 113: In origin men and women are segregated, and do not come together except for a need by Shar’ agreesto it and agrees to their assembly for it , such as trade and the pilgrimage. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 46: Scrutiny of actions of delegated assistants

Article 46: It is imperative that the Khalifah scrutinises the actions of the delegated assistants (Tafwid) and their management of the affairs, in order to confirm what was right, and to correct any errors, since the management of the affairs of the Ummah has been delegated to the Khalifah and is decided by his Ijtihad. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 28: The position of Caliph

Article 28: No one can be Khalifa unless the Muslims appoint him, and no one possesses the mandatory powers of the leadership of the State unless the contract with him has been concluded according tothe Shari’ah, like any contract in Islam. more