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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 94: Permissibility of power of attorney in private and public matters

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 94: It is permitted for the one who has been vested with a specific responsibility, like a custodian or guardian, or general responsibility such as the Khalifah, ruler, civil servant, Muhtasib, or judge of the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim), to appoint a person to his position as a proxy - within the bounds of his authority – in disputes and defence alone, and there is no difference whether they were the plaintiff or defendant.

Its evidence is the evidence for the giving of proxy, since as it is valid for a person to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issue they have control over such as buying, selling, and disputes, in the same manner it is valid to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issues they are acting on, on behalf of someone else. So the proxy, if given the right to deputise in the issue that they were given the proxy in, can deputise someone for themselves in that which they have control over as a result of being given the proxy. Accordingly, the guardian can deputise someone else to act on their behalf with the wealth of the one they are guardian over, and in the same manner the custodian of the Waqf is permitted to deputise whomever they please in all the affairs that he has the power of control over from the leasing of the Waqf and so on. Similar to them is the ruler, who is permitted to deputise whomever he pleases in any of the issues he has control over. Unless the ruler is the Khalifah, in which case it is permitted for him to deputise whomever he pleases because he possesses control over every matter, and so he is like the one who deputises on his own behalf, whereas anyone other than the Khalifah, from those who are his delegates such as the assistants, governors, and department managers, do not have the power to deputise on their behalf in that which they have been deputised control over unless the Khalifah gave them the right to do so. This is because they are the delegates of the Khalifah, and so they are similar to the deputies, and the deputy has no right to deputise his duty unless he was given that right. So if his deputation gave him that power, then he would have the right of deputation irrespective of whether he was a plaintiff or defendant, since the right to deputise is general and encompasses every issue that he acts in. Based upon that, what is known today as the attorney general (lawyer of the government), and the public prosecutor and prosecution, or anything else similar, then from the angle of the rules of proxy the work is valid according to the Shari’ah, since the Shari’ah permitted this type of deputation.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 7: How to implement the Shari'ah

Article 7: The State implements the Islamic Shari’ah upon all those who hold the Islamic citizenship, with no difference between Muslims and non-Muslims as follows: All the rules of Islam will be implemented upon the Muslims without any exception. The non-Muslims will be allowed to follow their beliefs and worships within the scope of the general system. The rule of apostasy will be implemented… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 101: The civil servants

Article 101: The civil servants other than the managers are appointed, transferred, suspended, disciplined, and removed by the one who is in charge of the departments, administrations or divisions. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 27: The pledge upon obedience and the pledge of contracting

Article 27: If the Khilafah is contracted to an individual by the pledge of those it is valid to be contracted with, the pledge of the remainder of the people is a pledge upon obedience and not a pledge of contracting; and so, any one who is seen to have the potential of rebellion is forced to give the pledge. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 1: The Islamic belief ('Aqeedah) constitutes the foundation of the state

Article 1: The Islamic belief ('Aqeedah) constitutes the foundation of the state. Hence, nothing is permitted to exist within its entity, its structure or its accountability or any other aspect connected to it, unless the Islamic 'Aqeedahis its basis. At the same time, the Islamic 'Aqeedahacts as the basis of the constitution and Shari’ah laws; thus, nothing related to the constitution or to the… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 149: The permanent sources of income for Bayt Al-Mal

Article 149: The permanent sources of income for the Bayt Al-Mal are the booty, Jizya, land tax, a fifth of buried treasure, and Zakah. This income is collected continuously irrespective of whether there was a need or not. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 126: The wealth belongs to Allah (swt)

Article 126: The wealth belongs to Allah (swt) alone, and He (swt) has made human beings the trustees of it. Through this general trust they have been given the right to ownership of wealth. Allah (swt) has permitted for the individual to possess the wealth; so through this specific permission, he managed to possess it practically. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 84: The Muhtasib

Article 84: The Muhtasib is the judge who investigates all cases, in the absence of an individual litigation, involving the rights of the public that do not involve the Hudud (proscribed punishments) and criminal acts. more