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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 94: Permissibility of power of attorney in private and public matters

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 94: It is permitted for the one who has been vested with a specific responsibility, like a custodian or guardian, or general responsibility such as the Khalifah, ruler, civil servant, Muhtasib, or judge of the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim), to appoint a person to his position as a proxy - within the bounds of his authority – in disputes and defence alone, and there is no difference whether they were the plaintiff or defendant.

Its evidence is the evidence for the giving of proxy, since as it is valid for a person to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issue they have control over such as buying, selling, and disputes, in the same manner it is valid to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issues they are acting on, on behalf of someone else. So the proxy, if given the right to deputise in the issue that they were given the proxy in, can deputise someone for themselves in that which they have control over as a result of being given the proxy. Accordingly, the guardian can deputise someone else to act on their behalf with the wealth of the one they are guardian over, and in the same manner the custodian of the Waqf is permitted to deputise whomever they please in all the affairs that he has the power of control over from the leasing of the Waqf and so on. Similar to them is the ruler, who is permitted to deputise whomever he pleases in any of the issues he has control over. Unless the ruler is the Khalifah, in which case it is permitted for him to deputise whomever he pleases because he possesses control over every matter, and so he is like the one who deputises on his own behalf, whereas anyone other than the Khalifah, from those who are his delegates such as the assistants, governors, and department managers, do not have the power to deputise on their behalf in that which they have been deputised control over unless the Khalifah gave them the right to do so. This is because they are the delegates of the Khalifah, and so they are similar to the deputies, and the deputy has no right to deputise his duty unless he was given that right. So if his deputation gave him that power, then he would have the right of deputation irrespective of whether he was a plaintiff or defendant, since the right to deputise is general and encompasses every issue that he acts in. Based upon that, what is known today as the attorney general (lawyer of the government), and the public prosecutor and prosecution, or anything else similar, then from the angle of the rules of proxy the work is valid according to the Shari’ah, since the Shari’ah permitted this type of deputation.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 98: Employment in the administrative system

Article 98: Anyone who carries citizenship, and is competent, whether male or female, Muslim or non-Muslim, can be appointed as a manager for an administration, a department, or a division, and to be a civil servant in it. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 54: Powers of governor

Article 54: The governor has the mandatory powers of ruling and responsibility over the tasks of the departments in his governorship as a delegate of the Khalifah, so he has all the powers in his province that the assistant has in the State. He has leadership over the people of his province and control over everything that is connected with it apart from the finances, judiciary and Army. However,… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 152:The expenditure of the Bayt Al-Mal

Article 152: The expenditure of the Bayt Al-Mal is divided across six sections: a- The eight categories which deserve the Zakah to be spent upon them, from the chapter of Zakah. b- The poor, the needy, the wayfarer, Jihad, and those in debt – if there is nothing found in the chapter of Zakah, they are given money from the permanent sources of income of the Bayt Al-Mal, and if nothing is found… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 77: Types of judiciary

Article 77: The Judges are of three types: One is the Judge (Qadi), and he undertakes settling the disputes between people over transactions and penal codes. The second is the Muhtasib, who undertakes the settling of any breach of law that may harm the rights of the community. The third is the judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim), who undertakes the settling of disputes between the people… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 23:The state apparatus

Article 23: The state apparatus is established upon thirteen institutions: The Khalifah (Leader of the State) The Assistants (delegated ministers) Executive minister The Governors The Amir of Jihad The Internal Security The Foreign Affairs Industry The Judiciary The People’s Affairs (administrative apparatus) The Treasury (Bayt Al-Mal) Media The Ummah’s Council (Shura and accounting) more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 142: Hoarding of wealth is prohibited

Article 142: Hoarding of wealth is prohibited, even if Zakah is paid upon it. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 86: Deputies of the Muhtasib

Article 86: The Muhtasib has the right to appoint deputies for him. They should fulfil the requirements of the Muhtasib, and he is allowed to assign them to different places. Those deputies would have the power to carry out the duties of the Hisbah in the areas to which they have been assigned, and in the cases for which they have been delegated. more