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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 94: Permissibility of power of attorney in private and public matters

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 94: It is permitted for the one who has been vested with a specific responsibility, like a custodian or guardian, or general responsibility such as the Khalifah, ruler, civil servant, Muhtasib, or judge of the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim), to appoint a person to his position as a proxy - within the bounds of his authority – in disputes and defence alone, and there is no difference whether they were the plaintiff or defendant.

Its evidence is the evidence for the giving of proxy, since as it is valid for a person to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issue they have control over such as buying, selling, and disputes, in the same manner it is valid to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issues they are acting on, on behalf of someone else. So the proxy, if given the right to deputise in the issue that they were given the proxy in, can deputise someone for themselves in that which they have control over as a result of being given the proxy. Accordingly, the guardian can deputise someone else to act on their behalf with the wealth of the one they are guardian over, and in the same manner the custodian of the Waqf is permitted to deputise whomever they please in all the affairs that he has the power of control over from the leasing of the Waqf and so on. Similar to them is the ruler, who is permitted to deputise whomever he pleases in any of the issues he has control over. Unless the ruler is the Khalifah, in which case it is permitted for him to deputise whomever he pleases because he possesses control over every matter, and so he is like the one who deputises on his own behalf, whereas anyone other than the Khalifah, from those who are his delegates such as the assistants, governors, and department managers, do not have the power to deputise on their behalf in that which they have been deputised control over unless the Khalifah gave them the right to do so. This is because they are the delegates of the Khalifah, and so they are similar to the deputies, and the deputy has no right to deputise his duty unless he was given that right. So if his deputation gave him that power, then he would have the right of deputation irrespective of whether he was a plaintiff or defendant, since the right to deputise is general and encompasses every issue that he acts in. Based upon that, what is known today as the attorney general (lawyer of the government), and the public prosecutor and prosecution, or anything else similar, then from the angle of the rules of proxy the work is valid according to the Shari’ah, since the Shari’ah permitted this type of deputation.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 144: The Jizya

Article 144:Jizya is collected from non-Muslims (people of Dhimma). It is to be taken from the adult men if they are capable of paying it, and it is not taken from women or children. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 42: The Delegated assistant

Article 42: The Khalifah appoints a delegated assistant or more for himself, who carry the responsibilities of ruling. So he delegates to them the management of affairs, where they conduct them according to their opinion and Ijtihad. On the death of the Khalifah, the role of his assistants ends, and they do not continue in their work except for the period of the temporary leader. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 161: Foreign trade is assessed on the basis of the citizenship

Article 161: Foreign trade is assessed on the basis of the citizenship of the trader and not the origin of the goods. Merchants from countries in a state of war with the State are prevented from trading in the State, unless given a special permission for the merchant or the goods. Merchants from countries that have treaties with the State are treated according to the terms of the treaties.… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 82: Permissible to vary the grades of courts

Article 82: It is permissible to vary the grades of courts in respect to the type of cases. Some judges may thus be assigned to certain cases of particular grades and other courts to be authorised to judge the other cases. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 178: Education is compulsory and free for all

Article 178: It is an obligation upon the State to teach every individual those matters that are necessary for the mainstream of life, male or female, in the primary and secondary levels of education. This must be provided free of charge to everyone, and the State should, to the best of its ability, provide the opportunity for everyone to continue higher education free of charge. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 108: Shura (consultation) and Mashwarah (deliberation)

Article 108: Shura (consultation) and Mashwarah (deliberation) is the taking of opinion in its absolute meaning, and it is not binding in legislation, definitions, and nor intellectual issues such as disclosing facts, nor technical and scientific issues; and it is binding when the Khalifah consults in any operational issue and the actions that do not require research and deep examination. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 71: The police (Shurtah)

Article 71: The police (Shurtah) have two branches: the military police, who are under the command of the Amir of Jihad, in other words, the war department, and the police who are under the control of the Ruler to protect the security, and they are under the authority of the Department of Internal Security. The two branches have specific training and specific culture in order for them to carry… more