nusr-khilafah-en

Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 94: Permissibility of power of attorney in private and public matters

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 94: It is permitted for the one who has been vested with a specific responsibility, like a custodian or guardian, or general responsibility such as the Khalifah, ruler, civil servant, Muhtasib, or judge of the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim), to appoint a person to his position as a proxy - within the bounds of his authority – in disputes and defence alone, and there is no difference whether they were the plaintiff or defendant.

Its evidence is the evidence for the giving of proxy, since as it is valid for a person to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issue they have control over such as buying, selling, and disputes, in the same manner it is valid to deputise another person to act on their behalf in the issues they are acting on, on behalf of someone else. So the proxy, if given the right to deputise in the issue that they were given the proxy in, can deputise someone for themselves in that which they have control over as a result of being given the proxy. Accordingly, the guardian can deputise someone else to act on their behalf with the wealth of the one they are guardian over, and in the same manner the custodian of the Waqf is permitted to deputise whomever they please in all the affairs that he has the power of control over from the leasing of the Waqf and so on. Similar to them is the ruler, who is permitted to deputise whomever he pleases in any of the issues he has control over. Unless the ruler is the Khalifah, in which case it is permitted for him to deputise whomever he pleases because he possesses control over every matter, and so he is like the one who deputises on his own behalf, whereas anyone other than the Khalifah, from those who are his delegates such as the assistants, governors, and department managers, do not have the power to deputise on their behalf in that which they have been deputised control over unless the Khalifah gave them the right to do so. This is because they are the delegates of the Khalifah, and so they are similar to the deputies, and the deputy has no right to deputise his duty unless he was given that right. So if his deputation gave him that power, then he would have the right of deputation irrespective of whether he was a plaintiff or defendant, since the right to deputise is general and encompasses every issue that he acts in. Based upon that, what is known today as the attorney general (lawyer of the government), and the public prosecutor and prosecution, or anything else similar, then from the angle of the rules of proxy the work is valid according to the Shari’ah, since the Shari’ah permitted this type of deputation.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 41: The Decision about change and removal the Caliph

Article 41: The court of the Madhalim (injustices) is the only authority that can decide whether the change in the situation of the Caliph (Khalifah) removes him from the leadership or not, and it is the only authority that has the power to remove or warn him. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 51: Powers of executive assistant

Article 51: The executive assistant is directly connected to the Khalifah, like the delegated assistant, and is considered as an assistant but only in terms of execution and not in ruling. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 12: The sources of legislation

Article 12: The Book, the Sunnah, the Ijmaa’ of the Sahabah and the Qiyas (analogy) are the only evidences considered in Shari’ah laws, and it is not permitted to adopt any legislation from other than these evidences. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 175: Islamic culture is mandatory in all levels of education

Article 175: The Islamic culture must be taught at all levels of education. In higher education, departments should be assigned to the various Islamic disciplines as will be done with medicine, engineering, physics and anything similar. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 183: Political means and political methods

Article 183: Ends do not justify means, because the method is integral to the thought. Thus, the obligation and the permitted cannot be attained by performing a forbidden action. Political means must not contradict the political methods. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 98: Employment in the administrative system

Article 98: Anyone who carries citizenship, and is competent, whether male or female, Muslim or non-Muslim, can be appointed as a manager for an administration, a department, or a division, and to be a civil servant in it. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 57 : Term of office for the governor

Article 57: The governor’s term of office in a particular province is not to be long. He must be discharged whenever he becomes firmly established in his province or the people become enchanted with him. more