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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State / Judiciary

Article 89: Unlimited number of judges of Madhalim

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 89: There is no limit to the number of judges that can be appointed for the Court of Injustice Acts (Madhalim), rather the Khalifah can appoint as many as he may deem necessary to eradicate the Madhalim (injustice acts), whatever that number may be. Although it is permitted for more than one judge to sit in a court session, only one judge has the authority to pronounce a verdict. The other judges only assist and provide advice, and their advice is not binding.

The evidence that the judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) can be more than one is that the Khalifah is permitted to appoint one or more deputies to act on his behalf. However, if there are a number of judges of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim), their power to look into the injustices (Madhalim) cannot be divided, so each one of them would have the right to look into the cases of injustices (Madhalim). The Khalifah is however allowed to specify a judge for the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) in one province, or to specify him to a certain type of case, because he has the right to give a general governorship over the injustices (Madhalim) or a specific governorship if he wished. He can give a governorship over the whole of the State, or over a city or region, as he sees fit.

As for the fact that when the judge of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) looks into a case he should look into it on his own, this is because of what was mentioned earlier regarding the prohibition of having numerous judges in a single case, while it is permitted to have more than one judge in the same area. However, it is permitted for other judges of the Court of Injustices (Madhalim) to sit with him in court in a consultative capacity only, and they would not participate in the verdict. This is referred to his contentment and choice – so if he did not prefer that and opposed their sitting with him then they would not do so, since no one who distracts the judge from looking into his work should sit with him. However, if he left the court session he should consult them in the issue.

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State

Article 17: The ruling and the administration

Article 17: The ruling is centralised and the administration is decentralised. more
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Article 168: Exchange and trade of funds

Article 168: It is permissible to have exchange between the State currency and the currency of other states like the exchange between the State’s own coinages. It is permissible for the exchange rate between two currencies to differ provided the currencies are different from each other. However, such transactions must be undertaken in a hand-to-hand manner and constitute a direct transaction with… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 39: The duration and terms of the mandate of the caliph

Article 39: The Caliph (Khalifah) does not have a fixed term of office; as long as the Caliph (Khalifah) preserves the Shari’ah and he implements its rules, and is capable of carrying out the affairs of the State, he remains as a Caliph (Khalifah) as long as his situation does not change to one that would remove him from the leadership of the State. If his state changes in this manner, then it is… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 122: Custody of children

Article 122: Custody of the child is a right and duty upon the mother, irrespective of whether she is a Muslim or not as long as the child needs this care. If the child no longer needs the care, then the situation is examined. If both of the parents are Muslim then the child, whether boy or girl, chooses whomever they would like to live with, and they will join whomever they choose, irrespective… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 146:Taxes

Article 146:Muslims pay the taxes that the Shari’ah has permitted to be levied upon them in order to cover the expenditure of the Bayt Al-Mal, on the condition that it is levied on that which is surplus to the individual’s needs according to what is normal, and has to be sufficient to cover the needs of the State. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 139: The private property is protected

Article 139: The State is not permitted to transfer private property into public property, since public property is confirmed by the nature and characteristic of wealth and not by the opinion of the State. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 157: The State works to circulate the wealth amongst the citizens

Article 157: The State works to circulate the wealth amongst the subjects, and prevents it from circulating solely amongst a particular sector of society. more