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Constitution of the Caliphate State for Android

Constitution of the Caliphate State

The Caliph (Khalifah) (24-41); Delegated (Tafwid) Assistants  (42-48); Executive (Tanfidh) Assistant  (49-51); Governors (52-60); Administrative System, Treasury, Media (96-104); Amir of Jihad, Military Department, Army (61-69); Internal Security, Foreign Affairs, Industry (70-74).

Article 25: The Khilafah is a contract of choice and consent

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 25: The Khilafah is a contract of choice and consent, so no one is compelled to accept it, and no one is compelled to choose the one who would undertake it.

Read more: Article 25: The Khilafah is a contract of choice and consent

Article 26: The right to elect the Caliph

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 26: Every sane, adult Muslim, a male or a female, has the right to elect the leader of the State and to give him the pledge of allegiance; while the non-Muslims do not have such right.

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Article 27: The pledge upon obedience and the pledge of contracting

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 27: If the Khilafah is contracted to an individual by the pledge of those it is valid to be contracted with, the pledge of the remainder of the people is a pledge upon obedience and not a pledge of contracting; and so, any one who is seen to have the potential of rebellion is forced to give the pledge.

Read more: Article 27: The pledge upon obedience and the pledge of contracting

Article 28: The position of Caliph

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 28: No one can be Khalifa unless the Muslims appoint him, and no one possesses the mandatory powers of the leadership of the State unless the contract with him has been concluded according tothe Shari’ah, like any contract in Islam.

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Article 29: Required from a country for a contracting pledge

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 29: It is stipulated that the authority of the region or the country that gives the Caliph a contracting pledge is autonomous dependent upon the Muslims alone, and not upon any disbelieving state; besides the security of the Muslims in that country, both internally and externally, is by the security of Islam not the security of the disbelief. With respect to the pledge of obedience taken from other countries, there are not such conditions.

Read more: Article 29: Required from a country for a contracting pledge

Article 30: Required for the allegiance of the Caliphate

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 30: The only conditions for the one who is given the pledge to be the leader of the State is that he fulfils the contracting conditions of the contract, even if he does not fulfil the preference conditions, since what matters are the contracting conditions of the contract.

Read more: Article 30: Required for the allegiance of the Caliphate

Article 31: Required for nomination and election of the Caliph

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 31: There are seven conditions for the Caliph to be contracted, which are: to be male, Muslim, free, adult, sane, just, and from the people who have the capability.

Read more: Article 31: Required for nomination and election of the Caliph

Article 32: Vacancy of the position of Caliphate

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 32: If the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) becomes vacant due to the death of its leader, his resignation or his removal, it is obligatory to appoint a Caliph (Khalifah) within three days from the date that the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) became vacant.

Read more: Article 32: Vacancy of the position of Caliphate

Article 33: The temporary Ameer

The Constitution of the Caliphate State, Article 33: A temporary leader is appointed to take charge of the affairs of the Muslims, and to prepare for the election of the new Caliph (Khalifah) after the vacation of the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) according to the following process:

  1. When the previous Caliph (Khalifah) feels that his life is coming to an end, or is committed to resigning, he has the right to appoint the temporary leader.
  2. If the Caliph (Khalifah) dies or resigns before appointing the temporary leader, or the position of the Caliphate (Khilafah) becomes vacant due to another reason, then the eldest of the assistants becomes the temporary leader unless he intended to be a candidate for the Caliphate (Khilafah) in which case the next senior assistant is to be given the position and so on.
  3. If all of the assistants intend to be candidates, then the eldest of the executive ministers will become the temporary leader or the one after him in seniority if he intends to be a candidate, and so on.
  4. If all of the executive ministers intend to be candidates for the Caliphate (Khilafah), then the position of the temporary leader is given to the youngest executive minister.
  5. The temporary leader does not have the right to adopt rules.
  6. The temporary leader makes all effort to complete the appointment of a new Caliph (Khalifah) within three days, and it is not permitted for this to be extended except due to overwhelming circumstances approved by the Madhalim court.    

 

Read more: Article 33: The temporary Ameer

Some articles of the Constitution

The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 101: The civil servants

Article 101: The civil servants other than the managers are appointed, transferred, suspended, disciplined, and removed by the one who is in charge of the departments, administrations or divisions. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 99: Management and responsibilities of interests and departments

Article 99 :A general manager has to be appointed for each office; and every department and administration has a manager who is responsible for its management, and is directly responsible for it; and they are accountable in terms of their work to whoever is in charge of the highest post of their offices, departments or administrations; and they are accountable in terms of their adherence to the… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 48: Responsibility of delegated assistants

Article 48: None of the delegated assistants (Tafwid) specialises in a specific department from the departments of the administrative institution, rather his responsibility is general, since those who undertake the administrative affairs are employees (civil servants) and not rulers, while the delegated assistant is a ruler. He is not entrusted with a specific authority in any of the tasks since… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 106: Election of Ummah- and Provincial Councils

Article 106: The members of the Provincial Councils are directly elected by the people in their provinces, and the number of members of any Provincial Councils is decided according to the ratio of the inhabitants in such province to the whole population of the State. The members of the Ummah Council are elected directly by the Provincial Councils. The start and end of the terms of the Ummah… more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 35: The right to appoint the Caliph and to remove him

Article 35: The Ummah is the one who appoints the Caliph (Khalifah). However, it does not possess the right to remove him once the pledge of allegiance has been concluded according to the Shari’ah method. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 96: Management of government’s and people’s affairs

Article 96: Management of the government’s and people’s affairs is carried out by offices, departments, and administrations, whose task is to ensure the management of the State’s business and the carrying out of the people’s interests. more
The Constitution of the Caliphate State,

Article 154: Employees are equal, regardless of the employer

Article 154: Company employees and those employed by individuals have the same rights and duties as employees of the State. Everyone who works for a wage, irrespective of the nature of the work, is considered an employee. In matters of dispute between employers and employees over salary levels, the salary level is to be assessed on the basis of the market. If they disagree over something else,… more